Bookmarks of an Oakland designer
Deirdre Spencer is a graphic designer, specializing in web design and printed marketing collateral. This is her Tumblr scrapbook of inspiring stuff.
Bookmarks of an Oakland designer
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papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
papress:

From Grafica Della Strada by graphic designer Louise Fili.Available September 2014. 
Reserve your copy here!
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milo317:

Marcel Duchamp, 1960
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typeverything:

Typeverything.com - Thumbprint portraits by Cheryl Sorg.
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berndwuersching:

17th century French folk art wooden carving of Madonna and Child
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philamuseum:

Happy birthday to American artist Man Ray (1890-1976)! You continue to inspire and amuse!“Portrait of Man Ray,” 1941, George Biddle
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midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
midcenturymodernfreak:

Alexander Girard: End of the Plain Plane
By David Foster of Herman Miller
In the mid-60s, Braniff International Airways, determined to mark “the end of the plain plane,” approached designer Alexander Girard to create an eye-catching visual identity for the company.
Having the opportunity to express himself on a truly grand scale, Girard left no aspect of the airline untouched. He designed Braniff’s logo, its boarding lounges, inflight stationary, ground equipment, and even the packages for its coffee and sugar. He had the entire fleet of airplanes painted hues ranging from deep grey to vermillion. “You can fly our airline seven times and never fly the same color twice,” boasted one Braniff executive.
In 1967, Girard designed a collection of furniture for use in Braniff’s lounges. Including chairs, sofas, and tables, the designs, while beautiful, were exorbitantly expensive to produce. As a result, Herman Miller only made the collection for two years.
In his effort to transform Braniff into “the most beautiful airline in the world” Girard initiated 17, 543 changes. His work received acclaim from both the press and public and certainly drew customers to the airline.
Unfortunately, Alexander Girard’s Braniff designs are no longer available today.
Via
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design-is-fine:

Max Ernst, exhibition poster Histoire Naturelle, Galerie Berggruen, 1956. Paris. Source